Thursday, April 16, 2015

Boeing's New Single Aisle Luggage Trough Attracks Travelers

Boeing is making its over head bins 50% larger. Yeah goes middle seat contemporaries. Hooray for business appointments juggernauts. Carry-on the overnight business suite of backpacks brief cases and Bin Luggage. Roll up your shirts, pack it and strike up the toothpaste. You can fly business junkie in the new and improved Boeing overhead Bin. Am I on a 787? Count the seats in your row before you sit down to make sure its okay. 1-2-3-4-5-6, yeah this is the new Max.

If the old Overhead bin only holds four carry-on bag stuffing, fifty percent bigger means space for an additional 2 carry-on. Holy-moly, is the 737 Max stretched longer down the length of the aircraft for six old bags per bin? Or will there be some overlapping Bins into the next Row?

Here is my own Overhead-Bin Schematic during passenger loading. I am the first luggage pig on the left at the trough.

Photo Credit: http://onthefarm.e2bn.org/littlefarm/library/1169628412/100_6563.jpg
Image result for Pigs at trough

Boeing will be upset with my six -eight pig trough schematic, so I will move to the actual photo of the Boeing schematic in concept mode.

Boeing Photo Credit

 Space Bins in 737 Configuration Studio

Hah-Hah, I was right about the bin space overlapping the rows within the confines of a seating/cabin space available. When one bin fills-up from "the luggage pigs", Boeing thinks the next bin which may be overlapping into your row will be available. In a perfect world, yes. This may be an enticement for a bigger problem! A passenger sees an opportunity, The passenger savvy pigs may adjust, since many may want to carry more stuff on, and push respectable person's who is loading late at the trough (me always), luggage goes back into baggage check status and onto terminal hell found at the destinations. The problem is with the airlines, who should only allow a passengers one carry on. Where so many additional items such as backpacks, purses and accessory cases slip past the "Bah, Bye" lead flight attendant during passenger loading.