Monday, July 21, 2014

Finally Understanding Boeing and Airbus Wing Technology Since Farnborough 2014 (No spell check was on during headline making)

After Farnborough, a great deal of time  was committed to understanding the two giant aircraft manufacturers approach for its vast (Boeing only) fleet of aircraft types. Then I watched the 787-9 fly for the 101st time over and over again at Farnborough. It struck me like a bolt of lightning. Boeing uses a different approach for wing development. It uses "live birds", and Airbus uses Popsicle sticks and tongue depressors in its wing development on its prototypical wing design models. The "Farnborough Climb" and the now banned "Dream Liner Touch and Go" are accompanied with The "787 Swan Lake (Music please) Turns" of a behemoth's debutant solo dance performance at the airshow.

Turn up the sound and watch


I didn't even see a tongue depressor swallowed at the show only gasping and envy. In fact the European contingent from England found a way to mute Boeing's performance, by banning its touch and go maneuver, "forever"!  Consolation prize, Airbus can't do it either even if it attempted it :<). I think they, the Farnborough airshow people, banned it because they were afraid Airbus would try stuff like this at the next airshow, causing some catastrophic disaster on its Paris turf. I agree with the the decision they made with the touch and go stunt. No airshow wants an Airbus disaster. Boeing will have to go do that flying around MT. Rainier, and then posting on its own web site. The coming of age for the 787 program has been a long awaited event. Some people just don't get it, and have no sense of class. John Leahy is a hard sell on Boeing advancements. I don't know why, but Airbus just acts that way? Boeing has really good airplanes when they behave at Airshows. However, they just go out out on the town (Farnborough)  and have a little fun. The Swan Lake stunt was just a little showing off and "showing the crowd the money".

Can you blame Boeing that they stole the show in front of everyone? The fighter jocks standing along the flighline next to their high performance rides wanted a piece of that action. If you are lucky enough to be a 787 pilot then you must learn how to spell the word "perpendicular".  That's straight-up from the top, on my word.

Back to Popsicle stick technology: A warning was missing from the video. "Don't try this stunt at home, these are professional wings flown by professional people and sold by professional people who are serious about aviation."

Does that mean that Airbus is not serious about aviation? Or have they just been down graded, to the second tier lessee market with emerging airlines flying its NEO A330 "Tin Lizzy". Ouch!!  I've got more zingers, that's why I can't be fired. Bloggers don't get fired, they get sent to spell check land or "sentenced" to advanced grammar school punishment. Its A No Harm No Foul License (NHNFL).

Tongue depressor wings are fantastic. They don't flex, bend, or curve. They just gag you during a flight as you bump along. The Boeing secret sauce are in its wings. The Boeing design folks are spot on and will continue, as they improve this profound technology. Airbus does lack this technology, as well as lacking Boeing's Proprietary Laminar Flow Technology (PLFT) concept currently flying on the 787-9. People may have experienced the, "Something I Didn't See At Farnborough Syndrome(SIDSAFS), unless you walked up to the 787-9 and petted its tail skin. Look close when you get close! The 787-9 is for real, as an advancement, over the most advanced 787-8. I can't wait for what is done to the -10 and the 7778X and 9X. A premium aviation gap has been established at Farnborough flying exhibition from the 787-9. The Airbus people have no answer.

The Main Things:
  • Popsicles or Tongue Depressors Gag Customers
  • Swan Lake feature music for the 787-9
  • "The Farnborough Victory Climb" V
  • Farnborough Is Too Touchy with Boeing's GO;
  • Banning "Stunts"... Saves Airbus From Embarrisment In Future Shows
  • NHNFL; SIDSAFS; PLFT